On 1911 Austin crime: ‘That murdered deputy sheriff was my grandfather’

These days, readers provide the lion’s share of material for Austin Found. Or at least they get the ball rolling.

Last month, we serialized the report of a 1911 double murder on West Monroe Street as reported in Ken Roberts‘ new book, “The Cedar Choppers: Life on the Edge of Nothing.” John Teague, son of a Hill Country clan, killed John Gest, owner of the Little South Austin Saloon, attempted to kill his bartender, Max Himmelreich, before heading west to the Balcones Escarpment. Around South First Street, he encountered Deputy Sheriff George Duncan (sometimes referred to as Lemuel). They wrestled and Teague killed Duncan as well. He received a 99-year sentence, yet less than 10 years later, Teague was released from prison.

RELATED: Double murder in 1911 did not merit much prison time.

Murdered Deputy Sheriff George Duncan. Contributed by Anna Galloway

Anna Galloway, who had worked with me on a story about the old rural community of Duval, which is now subsumed into North Austin off Duval Road, called to say: “That murdered deputy sheriff was my grandfather.”

“Of course you’ve heard the story that when Gov. Pa Ferguson was impeached, he asked for the names of 99 felons with 99-year sentences and pardoned them all,” Galloway relates about the extraordinarily corrupt politician. “John Teague was one of the 99.”

In fact, Teague was only on trial for the murder of Gest, since Himmelreich was a living witness. The authorities figured they had him.

Some 40 years later, Galloway says, one of Duncan’s five orphaned girls, Alta May Duncan, was working at Brackenridge when Teague was hospitalized. As a nurse, she was required to attend to the man who had murdered her father. She refused and was backed up by an upper supervisor who had the good sense to realize that Brack would be held liable if something fishy happened to Teague under her care.

Online records indicate that Teague died in May 1972.

RELATED: Best Texas books: “The Cedar Choppers” by Ken Roberts.

“The irony is that my great-grandmother made a decision soon after the funeral to move the widowed mother and her five girls to Hays County,” Galloway says. “They bought acreage with a lot of cedar trees. They built a charcoal kiln, chopped cedar and burned it in the kiln. Then they sacked charcoal which was brought into Austin and sold.”

In other words, they, too, became cedar choppers.

Austin Answered: When Billy Graham preached at the Texas Capitol

Reader Joan Johnson Culver writes to our Austin Answered project: “I have exhausted research looking for the visit that Billy Graham paid to Austin in the late ’40s or very early ’50s. He preached on the southwest corner of the Capitol grounds across from the governor’s mansion and what was then the old Cook Funeral Home. I was a very young teenager and attended the service and would love to read about it.”

Billy Graham preaching in Washington D.C. in 1952, the same year he held a revival on the state Capitol grounds. Contributed by the Billy Graham Library

It was not hard to track down reports about the April 27, 1952 revival led by Graham, who died Feb. 21 at age 99. We employed the searchable pre-1978 American-Statesman archives, available on ProQuest for free with an Austin Public Library card.

Answers to the Austin questions you have asked.

It appears that the invitation for the event came in Washington D.C. from Texas Attorney General Price Daniel, who was strongly supported by Texas Gov. Allan Shivers. In Austin, these leaders appeared on the platform with Graham along with other dignitaries.

It was a big show. Carpenters set up a choir loft for 500 voices. City electricians ran power lines to Capital grounds at West 11th and Colorado streets. Graham’s “Hour of Decision” radio and TV show was broadcast from that spot. Officials expected a crowd of 50,000, but no post-revival estimate could be found.

Celebrities, politicians react to Billy Graham’s death.

One Statesman reporter was impressed by Graham’s advance team.

“Religion to the team is not mournful, but a challenge,” reads the report. “Their talk is full of zip and their clothes are bright. They win people with their enthusiasm and sparkle as well as by their cause which they know can’t be beaten.”

Culver was ecstatic to receive the digital clippings. Back in 1952, she had been a senior at Austin High School and attended West Austin Baptist Church at West 12th and Elm streets. It later moved to West Lake Hills as Park Hills Baptist Church.

“Our youth group was a tight bunch doing everything together and having a wonderful time (even if we didn’t drink or dance),” Culver writes. “So we went as a group to that glorious service on the Capitol grounds to hear the young Rev. Billy Graham preach.  I just remember sitting on the grass totally mesmerized by the music, hearing George Beverly Shea sing ‘How Great Thou Art,’ and experiencing the power of Graham’s message.  In all the years since then — 66 years now — just hearing his voice or seeing his face would take me back to that 17 year old impacted by his message.”